Cindy Gallop: Faites l’amour, pas du porno

Cindy Gallop: Make love, not porn, TED2009.

About a decade ago, Cindy Gallop, a pixie-like businesswoman, said she began dating and sleeping with men about half her age. While their stamina and her experience made a good combination, Ms. Gallop said, she also discerned a disturbing trend: the boudoir moves of many of her young lovers seemed drawn entirely from pornography.

(…)

“As a mature, experienced, confident, older woman,” she added, “I have no problem realizing that a certain amount of re-education, rehabilitation and reorientation has to take place. ” As laughter rippled through the discomfited and rapt audience, Ms. Gallop unveiled a Web site, MakeLoveNotPorn.com, that compares what it calls the “porn world” with the “real world” of sex.

As graphic and funny as some of the language was, the site was mostly text. Now, Ms. Gallop is taking it up a notch with MakeLoveNotPorn.tv, a kind of YouTube for the erotically unabashed. The site, just a few weeks old and still in beta, consists entirely of videos uploaded by real people having what might be called nonperformance-like sex.

Spreading the Word (and Pictures) on ‘Real’ Sex, The New York Times.

Still in its invite-only beta phase, MLNP.tv provides a platform for its users to upload and share their own NSFW content—#realworldsex, rather than « porn » per se—which is reviewed and selected by the site’s backend staff and published at their discretion. Each submission is $5, a nominal fee Gallop hopes will keep out the spammers and trolls. Published content can be rented for $5 for three weeks at a time; there is a 50/50 profit split between the content creator and the house, which Gallop hopes will serve as incentive for users to promote their own content—in other words: pick up some of the marketing slack.

In a world practically bleeding viral Youtube videos, Gallop hopes MLNP.tv can harness that same viral video enthusiasm—and do it lucratively, no less.

MakeLoveNotPorn.tv Is the NSFW Social Media and Content-Sharing Platform the Internet’s Been Waiting For, Gizmodo.com.

1) Incredible woman —I LOVE her—; 2) Love the idea; and 3) What about gay porn?

How badly do you want it ?

Bruce Labruce jette une lumière différente sur une histoire sidérante dans une discussion en deux parties avec l’artiste trans* torontoise Nina Arsenault sur le tueur présumé Luka Magnotta.

In our conversations you also had some interesting ideas about the sad, recent death of porn star Erik Rhodes, who appeared in my movie L.A. Zombie. How do you think this relates to the Magnotta story with regard to the porn world?
Through blogging, Tumblr, and his porn films, Erik Rhodes seems to have produced and documented his own suicide through methamphetamine use, steroids, mental illness, and the sex trade. Magnotta has done the same with homicide. The age-old show business question about fame is, « How badly do you want it? » Would you be willing to kill for it? Die for it? It seems symbolic that these events happened so closely to each other. The way that a lot of porn stars use Twitter and Facebook is like their own continuing reality TV show, and sometimes it seems like they are forced to go to greater and greater extremes for attention.

— An Interview with Nina Arsenault (Part 1), Bruce Labruce, Vice.

Any final thoughts about or interpretations of this disturbing case history that you would care to make?
Maybe just to mention that Narcissistic Personality Disorder is actually being removed from the 2013 version of the Diagnostic and Statistic Manual of Mental Disorders, the guide used by psychologists and psychiatrists to treat patients. It’s the nature of mental illness that when these personality traits become more and more like everyone’s behavior, we can no longer call it pathology. It becomes the new normal.

— An Interview with Nina Arsenault Continues, Bruce Labruce, Vice.

Nina est par ailleurs une vraie plume, j’attendais ses chroniques hebdomadaires dans Fab’ avec impatience, quand j’habitais à Toronto.

Erik Rhodes et sa séropositivité

Further, there is something to the argument that the discomfort I felt — and that many, many others felt — is rooted in stigma and for that reason alone should be challenged. If Colt had said Rhodes had hepatitis C, how would we have felt? Probably less uncomfortable. How about if it was cancer or diabetes? Probably even less uncomfortable. But that’s all about personal ethics, not journalistic ethics.

We can’t control what is said about us after we’re dead, for obvious reasons. Journalists are supposed to be truth tellers, no matter what. I can’t fault the NYT or Bernstein for doing journalism. Should Colt have told Bernstein that Rhodes had HIV? That’s between Colt and his conscience, but Bernstein was within his rights as a reporter to use the information.

— Posthumous HIV Disclosure Stirs Debate, Oriol R. Gutierrez Jr., Poz Blog.

Évidemment que c’est pertinent de le dire. On n’est pas en 90. C’est une mort liée au sida, aussi, même si elle ne sera pas comptée comme telle dans les statistiques.

According to Mr. Colt, Mr. Rhodes found this out when he went to shoot a scene for Randy Blue, a company that requires testing. « They said, ‘Your test results came back, and you’re H.I.V. positive,’  » Mr. Colt said. Nevertheless, Randy Blue still managed to get Mr. Rhodes to film a solo scene that day, Mr. Colt said.

An Early Death but Perhaps Not a Surprise, The New York Times.

Le scène de masturbation la plus triste du monde. Se construire comme une dieu du sexe et se voir «reléguer» de cette manière, j’imagine la blessure, vu comment c’est déjà compliqué pour nous, simples mortels séropos. Il n’y a qu’un film listé avec lui sur Randy Blue. La bite au poing, la tristesse au fond des yeux.

[Edit 0:37] En parallèle, sur le sujet de la révélation de la séropositivité : Joseph Macé-Scaron porte plainte contre l’éditeur de Didier Lestrade pour «atteinte à la vie privée», Yagg.com.

C’est idiot. Laurent a raison :

Joseph Macé-Scaron est séropo. Avant, tout le monde l’ignorait et tout le monde s’en foutait. Maintenant, grâce à son action en justice contre Didier Lestrade, tout le monde le sait et tout le monde s’en fiche tout autant.

La séropositivité de Macé-Scaron, Embruns.net.[/Edit]

The Internet is (really) for porn

YouPorn hosts “over 100TB of porn”, and serves “over 100 million” page views per day. All told, this equates to an average of 950 terabytes of data transfer per day, almost all of which is streaming video. This is around 28 petabytes per month, which means our 29PB estimate for Xvideos is on the low side; it probably serves 35 to 40PB per month.

Just how big are porn sites?, ExtremeTech. Réponse : Very. Un site comme YouPorn représente 2% du trafic mondial.

Porn : The Reckoning

For a decade or so, to the porn industry, the Internet looked like the best thing ever invented—a distribution chute liberating it from the trench-coat ghetto of brown paper wrappers and seedy adult bookstores, an E-Z Pass to a vast untapped bedroom audience. If it was equally apparent that the web would prove as destabilizing as it has for other media, the money was so good that the industry could ignore the warning signs. Now the reckoning has arrived.

The Geek-Kings of Smut [via]. Comment internet défait et fait les fortunes du porno. Comment aussi les YouTube-like sont accusés de casser le marché et comment les « amateurs » un terme à utiliser avec prudence dans le porn, ont vu leur popularité exploser. Je ne connais personne qui paye pour du porn. Je n’ai jamais acheté un film de ma vie. Et je suis sûr que le futur offrira une place de choix aux sites d’UGC, même si on aime bien une bonne pornstar de temps en temps. Clairement en tout cas, les pédés sont d’énormes consommateurs. Comme le dit l’un des interviewés, à un mec (hétéro) tenté par la carrière:

“the gay side’s where all the money is. There might be 30 straight guys who can make a living at it, but if you’re willing to get fucked in the ass, I can get you five grand right now.”

And I was not aware there was a very important « big-tit–MILF niche ».